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We are more dedicated than ever to improving quality of life for children with musculoskeletal disorders. Advances in medicine have given us the ability to provide subspecialties of care in a variety of settings.

Learn about our 67 subspecialities:

Arthrogryposis (also called arthrogryposis multiplex congenital) is a condition in which a baby is born with joint contractures. This means a loss of movement, or a smaller range of motion, in the joint.

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Tumors are abnormal masses or lumps. They’re formed when cells divide out of control, and spread excessively throughout the body. Bone tumors can be found in any bone in the body, and in any part of the bone—from the surface down to the bone marrow (the spongy tissue inside the bone).

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Nerves are small bundles of fibers that send and receive messages between the brain and the body. The brachial plexus is a set of these nerves that controls the shoulder, wrist, hand, and elbow muscles. It also provides feeling in the arm. It starts from the neck and extends down the arms.

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Cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder (a disorder that involves the brain, spinal cord, and nerves). It impairs a child’s ability to move, maintain posture, or keep her balance.

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Clubfoot is a deformity where a baby’s foot turns inward. It’s very easy to see—in addition to the foot being turned, the clubfoot, calf, and leg are shorter and smaller than normal. It may look uncomfortable, but clubfoot is not painful during infancy.

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A congenital condition is one that is present from birth. A congenital limb deficiency (also called limb reduction) occurs when a limb doesn’t form correctly during pregnancy. This can cause a limb deformity—when the arm or leg is crooked, shortened, or bowed rather than straight.

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Organs are responsible for the body’s functions. Each organ is made up of several types of tissue that work together.

If tissues are the building blocks of organs, then connective tissues are the glue—they hold tissue together to give it its shape, keep it strong, and help it do its job.

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The foot is a walking example of “big things come in small packages.” It might seem small, but the foot is actually made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 muscles, ligaments, and tendons. 

With all of these parts—and the fact that feet often carry a person’s entire body weight every day—it’s easy for feet and ankles to become stressed. And that can lead to a variety of injuries.

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When a child has a hand injury, the tendons, ligaments, muscles, bones, or joints that make up her hands and wrists may stop functioning correctly. This type of injury can affect how well he can use his hands, and can have a negative impact on his everyday quality of life.

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When a child has hemophilia, his blood doesn’t clot normally. While he won’t necessarily bleed more than other children, he may bleed for longer. He may also have internal bleeding, where he bleeds inside of his body.

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When a child has dysplasia of the hip (also called developmental dislocation of the hip), her hip doesn’t form properly—the socket is too shallow and the ball can’t fit snugly inside. This can cause the hip to be loose and unstable, making it easier for her to dislocate her hip (move it out of place).

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Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 diseases that involve breakdown of the skeletal muscles. When a child has muscular dystrophy, his muscle tissue weakens and wastes away. 

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Arthritis is a rheumatic disease, meaning it affects the muscles and joints (the place where two or more bones meet). When someone has arthritis, his joints become inflamed, leading to pain, stiffness, swelling, or loss of motion. 

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Pediatric neurology is comprised of a specialized field of medicine that assesses, treats and manages an array of neurological conditions in newborns, infants, children and adolescents. 

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A prosthetic is a replacement for a missing limb. It can help a child with tasks of everyday functioning, like walking, getting dressed, or eating.

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When someone has scoliosis, the spine (also called the backbone) isn’t a straight line. Instead, it’s curved, usually in an “S” or “C” shape. Although scoliosis can affect people of all ages, it’s most commonly found in older children (ages 10 to 12) and teenagers.

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Skeletal dysplasia is not just one disorder—it’s a group of more than 300 disorders. It occurs when a child’s bones don’t develop the way they’re supposed to, usually causing short stature.

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The brain, spine, and spinal cord are responsible for nearly every function in the body. They’re so important that they are among the first body parts to form. Early in fetal development, they’re collectively known as the neural tube.

In most cases, the neural tube closes completely. However, in people with spina bifida, the neural tube does not form or close all the way. This can cause damage to the spinal cord and nerves.

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Kids love playing sports—so much so that over 21 million children in the US between ages 6 and 17 play an organized sport. And even more play sports on their own, during recess, after school, etc.

 

With all of that activity, it’s no surprise that there are millions of sports-related injuries each year. While some are minor, many are serious—landing almost 3 million US children in the emergency room every year for sports or recreation-related injuries.  

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The Urgent Care Center at Orthopaedic Institute for Children (OIC) provides comprehensive emergency medical care to children under 18 years of age with musculoskeletal injuries. 

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